Best Ski Boots For Flat Feet

Best Ski Boots For Flat Feet: Top 5 of 2021

Finding the best ski boots for flat feet can often feel like an uphill battle. Many skiers get confused about how much arch support they actually need, while others find it hard to choose a boot that matches their foot shape.

Here at SnowSunSee; we are far too aware of the discomfort that a poorly fitted ski boot can cause. During our countless years teaching clients on the slopes, we know that flat footed individuals should take extra care when choosing their new boots.

In this article, we will guide you through the process of finding the best ski boots for flat feet. We will provide reliable buying advice, compare the best products and provide an honest review of each option.

Ranking The Best Ski Boots For Flat Feet

  1. Rossignol Speed 120
  2. Salomon Shift Pro 120
  3. Nordica Speedmachine 3 130 S
  4. Salomon QST Access 70
  5. Nordica Sportmachine 100

Best Ski Boots For Flat Feet Comparison


Name

Price

Overview

Wide and flat beginners boot that offers supreme comfort while perfecting the basics

Mid-level boots that combine reliable performance with a medium last and generous fit

Superb performance focussed boot that's a comfortable and secure fit for skiers with flat arches

High level ski boot that delivers aggresive peformance and superb comfort for flat feet

Hybrid ski boots that provide comfort for flat footed skiers looking to explore the backcountry

Best For

Beginner

Intermediate

Advanced

Expert

Backcountry

Pros

Comfortable, flat underfoot, wide last, very forgiving, secure calf fit, hike/ride modes, easy entry/exit 

Width ideal for most flat feet, comfortable, consistent flex pattern, customizable, warm, easy entry/exit 

Flat underfoot, generous last, secure calf and ankle volume, responsive, comfortable, warm

Secure calf and ankle fit, wide enough last, secure instep height, customizable, comfortable, powerful

Adaptable last, stable calf and ankle, snug instep height, easily switch from skiing to skinning

Cons

Limited power, can feel sloppy

Poor liner durability, too HV for some

Difficult entry/exit

Expensive, too narrow for some

Too heavy for extended tours

Overall Rating

Last (Width)

104mm

102mm

104mm

100mm

100-106mm

Flex

70

100

120

130

120

Why Do I Need The Best Ski Boots For Flat Feet

Anyone that has flat feet needs to take extra care when choosing ski boots. If you choose the wrong option, you could cause yourself unnecessary pain that will ultimately detract from your skiing experience.

Skiers with flat feet should be looking for boots that can provide additional support. Deep heel cups and structured support are crucial to stabilizing your foot inside the boot.

Many ski boot brands use a high-arch design with minimal support that is unsuitable for flat feet. If you choose one of these products, you could be in for a painful experience.

Finding a product that perfectly matches your foot shape and technical ability can be challenging. However, the options we have listed are more than capable of providing stability for flat footed skiers of all skill levels.

Best Ski Boots For Flat Feet
If you have flat feet; finding stable ski boots is vital

How To Choose The Best Ski Boots For Flat Feet

Last (Width)

The term ‘last’ refers to the forefoot width of a ski boot. It is generally measured in millimeters, with most boots ranging from 96-104 in width.

As a general rule; skiers with flat feet require a wide last. With the sole and arch of your foot being firmly planted against the ground; overall foot shape often gets pushed wider than average.

It’s worth noting that narrow ski boots are one of the leading causes of foot pain. The crushing sensation that can occur is a recipe for discomfort on the slopes and usually requires urgent attention from a boot fitter.

Finding a boot with a medium-wide last will provide plenty of space to accommodate the added width. Most flat footed skiers will be looking at boots upwards of 100mm; depending on their own personal anatomy.

Category

Width

Narrow

96-98mm

Average

99-102mm

Wide

103mm+

Shape & Volume

Finding a ski boot that naturally accommodates flat feet is vital. Certain boots come with a wider forefoot shape, deeper heel cup and flatter arch; all of which are vital to comfort.

In general; the anatomy and fit of a boot will vary between brands. In our experience; we have found Nordica, Rossignol, Salomon and Technica are some of the most accommodating for flat feet. However, certain models from alternate brands might also meet your needs.

It’s worth noting that boots with a ‘high-volume’ fit provide the most space throughout the boot. Although this is often the comfort choice, it can decrease foot stability and control.

The key for flat footed skiers is to find a boot that has ample forefoot space, but still has a snug fit around the heel and ankle. Although this can be a difficult balance to find, we believe that the boots listed here have the attributes required.

Footbed & Insole

It’s safe to say that footbeds can have a big impact on comfort and performance. Despite being only a thin layer of foam, it can often dictate the overall comfort of your boots.

Most ski boots come with a stock insole that is thin and flat. Although it will allow plenty of space to accommodate your feet, it can often leave you feeling unsupported.

Getting an aftermarket insole is usually crucial for skiers with flat feet. It can vastly improve the stability and comfort of your ski boots. It can be a ‘game changer’ for many.

If you’re interested in further customizing your fit; we suggest you read our guide to the best ski boot insoles and footbeds. It provides a great analysis of what you should look for and gives you a list of our recommended products.

Flex (Ability Level)

The amount of ‘flex’ a ski boot has is a key performance indicator. It refers to how much the boot flexes under pressure and is given a numeric value.

Ski boot flex ratings generally range from 60-130+. The fit feel and performance of your boot is reliant on its flexibility, so choosing the right option is vital.

  • Soft flexing ski boots are best suited to beginners or lightweight skiers. They are the most comfortable and forgiving option, but also offer the least control.
  • Medium flexing ski boots are designed for intermediate skiers. They offer a great blend of comfort and performance. However, they can lack the stability required by ‘hard charging’ or heavyweight skiers.
  • Stiff flexing ski boots are designed for advanced, expert or heavyweight skiers. They provide supreme precision, control and support at high speeds. However, they are usually the most uncomfortable and unforgiving choice.

It’s key to choose a ski boot that matches your skill level if you want to maximize your performance. In order to guide you in the right direction; we have included the below table that correlates flex with ability:

Ability

Flex Rating

Feel

Beginner - Intermediate

60-90

Soft

Intermediate - Advanced

90-110

Medium

Advanced - Expert

100-120

Stiff

Expert - Race

120+

Very Stiff

Size

Ski boot sizing is a paramount consideration for any skier. If your boot is too big; you will sacrifice performance. It it’s too small; you will most likely have a painful experience.

The correct fit should be ‘snug’ but not painful. You should feel like the tip of your longest toe is gently resting against the end of the boot. You should still be able to wiggle your toes.

When you push forward with your shin, your heel should remain planted to the floor. The overall feel will be tight and secure, but without any pressure points.

Keep in mind that a tighter fit can improve performance, but it usually comes at a cost to comfort. Experienced skiers should be looking for a compact ‘performance’ fit, while beginners are best going for a slightly more relaxed ‘comfort’ fit.

Ski boot sizes are measured using the ‘mondopoint’ system. It’s a measurement of your foot length in centimeters and provides greater accuracy than shoe size.

You can easily measure your mondopoint size by standing with your heels against a wall, then measuring the distance from the wall to the tip of your longest toe.

However, if you’re looking for a quick solution, it’s also possible to correlate mondopoint with shoe size. In order to make your life easier, we have included the below table:

Mondopoint
(Comfort Fit)

Men (US)

Women (US)

22

4

5

22.5

4.5

5.5

23

5

6

23.5

5.5

6.5

24

6

7

24.5

6.5

7.5

25

7

8

25.5

7.5

8.5

26

8

9

26.5

8.5

9.5

27

9

10

27.5

9.5

10.5

28

10

11

28.5

10.5

11.5

29

11

12

29.5

11.5

-

30

12

-

30.5

12.5

-

31

13

-

31.5

13.5

-

32

14

-

Best Beginner Ski Boots for Flat Feet

Salomon QST Access 70

Salomon QST Access 70

Comfort

Fit

Control

Forgiving

Ease Of Use

Durability

Overall

Finding a comfortable pair of ski boots is essential if you’re still learning the basics. Upon review, we found the Salomon QST Access 70 provided an ideal base for flat footed skiers to perfect their turns thanks to its great fit and forgiving performance.

The boots come with an accommodating 104mm last and flat sole that is well suited to flat feet. The overall shape of the boot can be described as medium/high volume, providing a secure enough fit around the calves and ankles for reliable performance.

The 70 flex rating is forgiving enough to recover from the occasional mistake, although does tend to limit control at higher speeds speeds. It’s clear that the main focus of the boots has been warmth and comfort, which is true on and off the slopes thanks to a useful ‘hike mode’ setting.

The Salomon QST Access 70 is a natural fit for flat feet and a great choice for beginners. It’s soft, forgiving and comfortable enough to ensure your learning experience is painless and progressive.

Pros

  • Flat sole shape
  • Generous last width
  • Fairly secure calf and ankle
  • Forgiving
  • Super comfortable
  • Relatively snug instep
  • Easy step-in

Cons

  • Limited control
  • Too soft for some heavy beginners
  • Not a precision fit for most skiers

Best Intermediate Ski Boots for Flat Feet

Nordica Sportmachine 100

Nordica Sportmachine 100

Comfort

Fit

Control

Forgiving

Ease Of Use

Durability

Overall

Nordica have become a popular brand for flat footed skiers thanks to their focus on comfort and customization. The Speedmachine 100 is a perfect example of these traits; providing a generous fit without sacrificing performance.

Coming with a last width of 102mm and a generous volume that’s snug in all the right places; these boots feel supremely natural for skiers with low arches. We were impressed by the ‘precision fit’ liner that conforms naturally to wider feet and is highly customizable.

The downhill feel of the boots is a blend of comfort and performance. Those looking to spend most of their time on groomed intermediate slopes will find the power more than sufficient, although heavier skiers might find them a bit soft on steeper terrain.

Overall, we are a big fan of the Nordica Sportmachine 100 and highly recommend it for flat feet. Its natural shape, comfort and performance features combine perfectly for a smooth and forgiving all-mountain experience.

Pros

  • Very comfortable
  • Wide enough for most flat feet
  • Reliable flex
  • Good intermediate control
  • Forgiving when necessary
  • Customizable
  • Warm

Cons

  • Liner not very durable
  • Too high volume for some feet

Best Advanced Ski Boots for Flat Feet

Rossignol Speed 120

Rossignol Speed 120

Comfort

Fit

Control

Forgiving

Ease Of Use

Durability

Overall

Finding advanced level boots that are comfortable for flat feet can often feel like an uphill battle. However, the Rossignol Speed 120 provides the shape and performance that will keep your feet content.

The boots combine a wide 104mm last with a mid-height instep that’s ideally suited to flat feet. In addition, the medium volume calf and ankle design feels snug enough for high performance.

The 120 flex pattern feels smooth, consistent and provides enough control for ripping down hardpack at high speeds. Advanced skiers will also enjoy the strong and beefy feel of the Speed 120, with power transfer being a strong suit.

If you’re looking for a hard charging boot that can accommodate flat feet, we highly recommend the Rossignol Speed 120. Its wide last, relatively low instep and overall performance features make it one of our top picks.

Pros

  • Accommodating 104mm last
  • Secure instep height
  • Generous fit
  • Flat footbed shape
  • Customizable
  • Feels powerful
  • Responsive at speed
  • Good liner

Cons

  • Difficult entry/exit
  • Last too wide for some skiers
  • No women’s version

Best Expert Ski Boots for Flat Feet

Nordica Speedmachine 3 130 S

Nordica Speedmachine 3 130 S

Comfort

Fit

Control

Forgiving

Ease Of Use

Durability

Overall

The Nordica Speedmachine range has proven popular in recent years thanks to its reliable performance and adjustable fit. The latest version, named the ‘Speedmachine 3 130 S’, is an aggressive yet accommodating boot that will serve flat feet well.

By using a 100mm last width, the Speedmachine provides a snug fit but remains slightly wider than many expert boots. The calf, ankle and instep all feel secure for medium volume feet, while the low arch shape makes it a perfect pick for our review.

Unlike some high performance boots, the Speedmachine is exceptionally comfortable and feels relatively smooth on-piste. The boots also don’t feel short of power when necessary and have enough braun to support heavy hard chargers.

After assessing the performance characteristics; it’s easy to see why the Speedmachine is a popular boot. It blends a reliable and comfortable fit with highly capable downhill performance that flat footed experts will enjoy.

Pros

  • Snug yet generous fit
  • Highly customizable
  • Feels stable
  • Good instep height for flat feet
  • Comfortable
  • Powerful on any terrain
  • Warm liner

Cons

  • Too narrow for wider feet
  • Expensive
  • Flex can soften over time

Best Hybrid Ski Boots for Flat Feet

Salomon Shift Pro 120

Salomon Shift Pro 120

Comfort

Fit

Control

Forgiving

Ease Of Use

Durability

Overall

Hybrid alpine/backcountry boots have become increasingly popular in recent years with the rise of powder skiing. Out of the plethora of new crossover boots that have hit the market; we highly recommend the Salomon Shift Pro 120 for anyone with flat feet.

The boot shape and design has everything that flat footed skiers require. It has a wide and adaptable last, moderate instep and secure ankle region that promotes performance.

The boots are almost certainly too heavy for extended tours; but they are more than capable of supporting short hikes into untouched powder. The inbounds performance is impressive, with superb power and a feeling of control evident across the entire mountain.

Overall; we were thoroughly impressed by the all-round performance offered by the Salomon Shift Pro 120. Whether your hiking out or skiing in; you’re sure to find these boots a comfortable fit for your flat feet.

Pros

  • Great adaptable last
  • Ideal instep height for most flat feet
  • Snug mid-volume calf and ankle
  • Powerful inbounds performance
  • Backcountry hike mode included
  • Comfortable fit for most skiers
  • Customizable

Cons

  • Too heavy for long tours
  • Last width can naturally widen over time
  • Expensive

Summing Up

Finding the best ski boots for flat feet can be difficult. Every brand, model and design has a different feel that will best serve a specific foot shape.

Once you know the key indicators to look for, making a choice does become easier. It also takes plenty of experience to get an idea of which brands and products best suit skiers with low arches.

Thankfully, we’ve managed to draw on years of on-slope and research driven experience to compile this list. Every boot has proven effective at keeping wide feet comfortable. Now all that’s left to do is find the one that suits your skiing style.